Mitered Frames—Compound

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Compounds are frames made by combining two or more moldings so as to achieve a wider and/or more complex frame design. Most often a broader molding is enclosed in a smaller “cap molding.” Sometimes a narrow molding is used inside a larger molding, in which case the narrower profile is called a “sub-molding.”

Some compounds are simply more massive versions of our Basic Mitered frames—for example, the No. 2 + Cap-1 is simply a wider version of our No. 20—and others combine moldings to create more complex, decorative and elaborate designs. While the possibilities in basic, non-compound molding design are countless, combining them to create compound frames presents even greater creative opportunities. (We’ve arranged them here starting with the plainer styles and working toward the fancier designs.)

Far from being a set and finite offering, the examples shown here should truly be taken as a starting point—examples of what we have done in our ongoing mission of making the best frames we can for the particular pictures our customers bring to us. The most obvious variable factors are widths (nearly all profiles are available in more than one, if not any, width), woods (all frames* are available in any wood), combinations of moldings (we can mix and match profiles seen here or among our Basic Mitered frames), and basic forms (many slopes, for example, can be done as flats and vice versa). We look forward to working with you to come up with a frame ideally adapted to your picture and uniquely alive to it.

The major molding in the profile is indicated by the first number, followed by a “+” sign, followed by the cap and/or sub-molding(s) (“Sub”).

Oil painting in compound frameFramed Examples

See a gallery of examples of pictures framed in Compound Mitered designs. View…

 

 

Click images to preview, captions to go to large views or frame design pages (where available)…

*Or nearly all. The only exceptions are the No. 308 “Curtis”—3”, the wider Nos. 308.1 and 308.2 “Michigan”, and the No. 503 “Holland”—3”, which are all available only in quartersawn white oak.